Postbellum

Memory of Nation

 

Jan Škoda (1928)

.
 Jan Škoda (1928)
They put the father in prison and the sons to forced labour

With the AEC in Julius Fučík (previously Progress) Mine

“Then they took us to the labour camp to work in the mines. We met with acers [members of the AEC - trans.] that had been sent straight there. Say my cousin from Trusovice, who was the same age as me. We went to get checked up by a doctor, and everyone tried to come up with all kinds of childhood illnesses that would get him excused from mining. Then we worked in Progress Mine. The acer garrison and HQ were in Kamchatka, which was a short distance from Progress. We had our commander there, we called him Vrecko [Slovak for ‘pocket’ - trans.]. He was a Slovak, and when we had our hands in our pockets, he told us not to have our hands ‘vo vrecku’. We mined there. The first time you went down inside, you were scared. It was dark, and we only had a carbide lamp. We acted as helping hands to the older soldiers. They drilled the wall with jackhammers, and we shovelled it on to the conveyor belt, which took it to the sorting room.”

  • born 8 January 1928 in Žerotín
  • his family was persecuted during the collectivisation
  • from October 1950 to December 1953, forced labour in the AEC
  • while in the AEC, worked in Julius Fučík Mine in Petřvald
  • his brother also served in the AEC
  • his father was imprisoned for a year
  • chairman of the local AEC Union in Jeseník
  • as of 2017, lives in Jeseník
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