Postbellum

Memory of Nation

 

Jan Hauer (1947)

.
  Jan Hauer (1947)
It is important to know who our ancestors are and where they came from

Horses better than women

“For the guys, imagine, a horse was more valuable than a woman. Really, I’m not lying one word. Having a horse meant it could pull a trailer and whatever. When selling it, one could get a lot of money for it. One could get a different horse in return and extra money on top. So, at that time, horses were really valuable for the guys. On the other hand, a woman – unless she would go steal and bring back chickens, geese and such things – had zero value. She was only a mother of one’s children, and he wasn’t even interested. This is really how things were. For the women, those must have been terrible times. Ever since childhood, I recall the guys playing cards under a tree while the woman had to take care. Things really were different back then. When the communists took power, those guys were forced to go to work.”

  • born in 1947 in Olomouc into a Sinti family
  • his father Antonín spent the war in Olomouc prison, his first wife and four children were murdered in Auschwitz
  • both parents imprisoned after the war for doing door-to-door selling
  • the family was subject to the 1958 Act on the Permanent Settlement of Footloose Persons
  • their trailer was set on fire
  • despite the prohibition of nomadism, they were allowed to travel with Josef Homolka's theater company
  • after finishing school worked as carpet beater and coal distributor
  • from 1967 till 1969 spent time in Germany with his father, tracking the fate of his first family
  • spent a decade grinding knives and repairing umbrellas at Vinohrady
  • still inquires about his ancestors and their destinies
Pro spuštění videa je nutný nainstalovaný přehrávač Adobe Flash Player.
Materiály jsou převzaté z portálu www.pametnaroda.cz a veškerá práva k užívání těchto materiálů vycházejí z práv konkrétních projektů na tomto portále. Více se dočtete v profilu pamětníka zde.